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20100927
20100927
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. so we're trying to focus that anger. >> that's why democratic leaders are using the remaining days before at the election to push 11th hour legislation. >> creating jobs by making it in america, not transferring jobs overseas. >> a series of bills in the house, even one this week requiring american flags to be made in america. now, in the senate, the bill to end some tax breaks for companies expanding overseas and giving new tax incentives to businesses bringing jobs home. >> when a corporation tries to take away someone's job and send it halfway around the world, we have to stop them. >> this bill we'll be voting cloture on on tuesday will do nothing to create jobs here in our country. >> republicans scoff at what they call the latest in a series of desperate last-minute political votes. melman and other democratic strategists are telling their candidates, this -- >> it's a bright line. it won't be enough to change the whole political climate. is it enough to win some seat somewhere? the answer is yes. >> a little bit of a reality check. democratic sources say they know the legisl
help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: always a pleasure to have ken burns on this program. he has once again turn his attention to america's pastime for a new documentary called " baseball: at the 10th inning," airing on most pbs stations on september 28. here is a scene from that documentary. >> far base ball players have succumbed to societal pressures to improve themselves, they are no worse than we are. >> people get upset. who in the whole country would not take a pill to take more money at your job? you would. if i said there was a pill in you'd get paid like steven spielberg, you would take the pill. tavis: ken burns joins us from charlotte, north carolina. is that chris rock peace convincing? >> no, it is fun
in nearly 20 years. here folks are used to the river rising after heavy rains but not like this. >> what went through my head is, boy, i better get all my stuff. >> reporter: in west wisconsin, too, sunday was day of rummaging through water-logged homes and belongings. troy bilan lives in the hard-hit town of arcadia. >> i got a phone call from a few phones letting me know flooding was occurring in arcadia. i got up and my house was already full. >> water and mud wiped out everything in his basement and garage, even his new car. flood insurance will cover the damage, but money isn't always enough. this was his grand parents' pool table. >> sentimentally you can't replace that. >> reporter: wet fields will keep farmers from what they hoped would be an early harvest, and even after these parts dry out, the flood threat continues. this high water will swell the mississippi river and could threaten iowa in early october. cynthia bowers, cbs news, chicago. >> in afghanistan, military officials say u.s. and afghan forces have launched an offensive against the taliban. the districts near their
bowers is in portage, wisconsin to bring us up to date. good morning, cindy. >> reporter: good morning, maggie. this earthen he levee is part of a series of dikes built mostly sand way back in the 1890s. sunday parts began to erode or give way as people in the historic town of portage are seeing the wisconsin river at its highest level since 1938. here in portage, the wisconsin river reached 20.5 feet sunday. that's even higher than the predicted crest, which forecastrs said wouldn't come until later today. 300 residents were asked to evacuate but those who stayed behind were trapped when local highways were shut down. >> they told us that we have -- that we had ten minutes to get out of there because they are blocking off all the roads back there. >> reporter: all this flooding was the result of extraordinarily heavy rains that fell across the upper midwest last week, as much as 10 to 12 inches in some areas. in the western wisconsin town of arcadia, some folks were allowed to return to their homes only to find their belongings water-logged. >> phone calls from a few friends letting m
changed our weather at the tern from last week to where it is now. and we'll show you what it means for us, it means a lot of rain, thunderstorms and even the potential for flooding. we saw a warning or two today. we have the bands from the south and moving to the north. they'll continue to move our way. and there's more to the south and we'll take you in on a few areas and we'll show you where we're dealing with this thousand. and a little bit in carroll county, that's making its way to the north and lighter rain at this point. that's going to change. you can see the heavier rain and that's moving to the north and we have more where that came from. we have flood warnings because of this. where we've seen the heaviest rain so far, you can see montgomery and carroll county and baltimore county and these are for say ring times through 4:50 through 4:40. this is throughout the overnight and into tomorrow. veal the forecast coming up. >>> thank you, and stay with wjz-13 for first warning weather coverage. as we mentioned, remember, wjz- 13 is always on. go to wjz.com for more at any time. >> >
weather center tracking all of this for us this morning. so are they still in a situation where the waters are still rising now? >> no, the river at least at portage did crest last night. but it's going to remain above flood stage for quite some time. not only across wisconsin, but southern and central parts of minnesota. we've got all these rivers that are actually draining into the mississippi. and we're going to see some issues, i think, downstream from there, as well. so that's issue number one. issue number two is -- more immediate concerns, what's going on in portage. here's where the river crested. the record is is 20.5 feet. it crested just above that last night. and now it's at about 20.2 feet. we're at near record strange. major flood stage, but not expected to come back down below flood stage really until late wednesday into thursday. so we've got quite some time before this river really gets below the danger zone. and what i mean by danger zone is, well, usually after a river crests, we can relax, but because of this situation where you have all of that pressure on this very, v
surprise to me. what else? >> tommy says i'm awake because my neighbor used the hot tub to make chilli and it exploded in the middle of the night. >> that tells you everything you need to know about new york jets fans, using their hot tub to make chilli for a football party. it's time for education. "morning joe" starts right now. >>> we have gotten so used to failure. we tolerate failure in places like d.c. and central harlem, detroit. we tolerate that failure. we have to say to this nation, no more, there's no downside to failure. you can fail those kids for another 20 years. everybody keeps their job. >> it's about jobs. >> no business in america would be in existence if it ran like. this we can't have our school system running like this. >>> welcome to a special edition of "morning joe." we're live. do you know where we are, joe? >> i have no idea. >> education plaza. learning plaza. are you going to learn something, boys, today? >> no. willie, how were you in school? >> good, not great. >> i was bad, not good. >> you were? >> yeah. >> you'll learn something today. i think you migh
. those who stayed behind were trapped when local highways were shut down. >> they told us we have -- that we had 10 minutes to get out of there because they are blocking off all of the roads back there. >> reporter: all of this flooding was the result of extraordinarily heavy rains that fell across the upper midwest last week, as much as 10 to 12 inches in some areas. in the western wisconsin town of arcadia, some folks were allowed to return to homes only to find their belongings waterlogged. >> phone calls from friends letting me know that flooding was occurring so i got up and my house was already full. >> reporter: water and mud wiped out everything in troy's basement and garage, even his new car. flood insurance will cover the damage but money isn't always enough. this was his grandparents' pool table. >> sentimental, you can't replace that. >> reporter: south dakota saw its worst flooding in 20 years. sunday the big sioux river was above flood stage. >> boy, you better get my stuff. >> reporter: 60 homes and 20 businesses were lost in zumbro falls. sweeping more than 12 feet
south to north. high temperatures today should be in the mid 70's for most of us. we are in the mid 60's right now. upper 50's farther out west. southeast wind at 10-20. becoming gusty tonight's. if tomorrow morning rain translates to afternoon sunshine. not to lisa baden. >>> out of crofton its been a long morning on the ramp from route 3 heading onto stifter west, there is deep water at the end of the ramp. if there's a wreck betwnear 197. greenbelt road, that exit ramp to the military base is closed. virginia has a wreck north on 95 before the occoquan river near the 123 it-woodbridge exit, the right lane is closed. -- 12>>> police found a victimt before midnight in the 3400 block of dot are quoted in landover. the man had been shot and was discovered in the vehicle. he was pronounced dead at a hospital. police are searching for the gunman. >>> police hope evidence left behind will lead them to hit and run driver. a young woman suffered a critical injury after being hit by a car saturday night along the 8700 block of carroll avenue. courtney robinson joins us from silver spring with m
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)